Negotiated photography project

This journal entry is an ongoing living and breathing document that details the progress of my 'negotiated photography project' up until the point of submission to the university later in the year. Thereafter, it will become a record of how I produced a body of photographic work in accordance with the specifics of a university project.

Project summary:

  • The idea began broadly as a fine-art oriented piece around portraits, and so I began exploring whether I wanted to photograph other people or myself.
  • A series of shoots commenced using instant film, medium format and large format, while galleries were visited, and books perused for inspiration. I also investigated film backs for my Hasselblad such as the Rezivot on Kickstarter and second hand Polaroid backs, as well as discontinued Fuji FP-100C film. I tried the Lomo Instant Wide and the Fuji Instax Wide cameras and MiNT refurbished Polaroid cameras.
  • I learned how to develop colour film myself (C-41 process), allowing for a speedier and more cost-effective turnaround time.
  • A realisation that I focus too much on the 'how', and not the 'what' - the camera and medium are irrelevant, the idea is what's relevant, it's the concept that is important.
  • Finalisation of my concept - the exploration of self-identity and self-image - we all wear masks in projecting ourselves to the outside world. So, in challenging that, I am seeking to photograph a warts-and-all approach to self-representation in a series of unflattering and non-self-conscious self-portraits to counter the falseness of how people present themselves on Social Media platforms like Instagram and Facebook.
  • The means of and method of the final presentation of my work is now fully formed - a Social Media-inspired homemade zine.

Inspiration

I visited the Sony World Photography Awards at Somerset House today. Although my project is well underway and beyond the 'inspiration phase', I wanted to see these credible works just because, duh. Suffice it to say, much of the work was incredible and I spoke with a few of the winning photographers, watched many more being interviewed by the press and enjoyed the exhibit.

Figure 133. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2018 50)
A work by shortlisted artist Edgare Adams.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
Figure 134. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2018 51)
A work by shortlisted artist Daren You.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
Figure 135. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2018 52)
A work by shortlisted artist Lebohang Kganye.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
Figure 136. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2018 53)
A work by shortlisted artist Niki Gleoudi.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe

Practical

I plan to start designing up my zine idea soon and just playing around with ideas.

I've updated my workbook with some prints that will likely make the final submission, with accompanying notes.

My final submission will likely be in the form of photographs of the individual pages of the zine that I plan to work up as the next stage of my project. These will be submitted in the form of a PDF. I will also likely film the zine, with pages being turned, published on my journal entry via YouTube and submitted as a separate video file.

I’m yet to finalise the artwork for the Instagram-style posts, but these will populate the zine as will other artworked elements – likely full page background crops of the photos or comments.

The zine will be of an intentionally low quality to convey the very self-made, home-made nature of it. Perhaps photocopies of photocopies will be produced for their low-quality nature.

I plan to produce maybe three of these, each hand-numbered and signed and left around my local area, with a business card attached by paperclip.

I don’t plan on submitting the individual images or artworked social media posts separately for this submission.

A photo of my workbook detailing ideas for my zine
Figure 132. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2018 49)
Sketches in my workbook detailing thoughts around how I'll work up my zine.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe

Practical

I've updated my workbook with some prints that will likely make the final submission, with accompanying notes.

Figure 128. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2018 45)
Contact sheets showing potential final images for submission.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
Figure 129. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2018 46)
Contact sheets showing potential final images for submission.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
Figure 130. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2018 47)
Contact sheets showing potential final images for submission.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
Figure 131. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2018 48)
Mock-ups of the Instagram-style posts for submission.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe

Practical

Reflecting back on some of the experiments I made during the course of discovery for this project, I've decided to document some of them here, for accountability sake and to demonstrate evolution of my idea in finding my concept and exploring execution of my work.

Figure 123. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2018 40)
Playing around with ideas lead to some digital editing to cut out the rude bits.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
Figure 124. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2018 41)
A similar digital editing technique to replicate a hole punch to hide something.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
Figure 125. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2018 42)
Ideas around censorship being explored in this image.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
Figure 126. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2018 43)
An experimental edit on a photo taken as part of my assessment. I submitted this image to the Lensculture Portrait Awards 2018.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
Figure 127. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2018 44)
A similar image edited the same way.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe

Practical

An abridged contact sheet from a single roll of 36 exposures, and shoot ideas sketched into my workbook, all from my most recent shoot late last week. I'll likely aim for one more shoot this coming weekend and then start to collate a series of images that I think work well.

A photo of my workbook sketches illustrating thoughts around what to capture for my next shoot
Figure 120. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2018 37)
My most recent shoot plans sketched out as before. I aimed to shoot about 4 frames per idea to maximise economy.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
A photo by Sanja Marusic showing a person jumping seemingly above a lake covered in colourful pieces of fabric
Figure 121. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2018 38)
Abridged contact sheet one.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
A photo by Sanja Marusic showing a naked woman half painted blue against a backdrop of a blue sky with clouds
Figure 122. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2018 39)
Abridged contact sheet two.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe

Inspiration

I mentioned on the 12th of March about an on-location approach to this work as a next-step for developing a body of work after my assessment submission, or at least in the near future. Here is some inspiration for developing this beyond the current work that I'm beginning to gather. These photos are from photographer Sanja Marusic.

A photo by Sanja Marusic showing a person jumping seemingly above a lake covered in colourful pieces of fabric
Figure 118. (Source: Marusic, n.d. a)
A photo by Sanja Marusic full of colour and creativity in composition with the subject seemingly jumping over water.
Photo by: Sanja Marusic
A photo by Sanja Marusic showing a naked woman half painted blue against a backdrop of a blue sky with clouds
Figure 119. (Source: Marusic, n.d. b)
A tight crop photo by Sanja Marusic full of colour and creativity with background focus.
Photo by: Sanja Marusic

Practical

Some proof of concept shots from February and March to illustrate some the ideas I'm working through for my assessment.

A proof of concept photo depicting me sitting in a box
Figure 114. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2018 33)
A recent photo from a recent shoot - sitting in a box.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
A proof of concept photo depicting me holding my out-turned pockets
Figure 115. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2018 34)
A recent photo from a recent shoot - holding my empty pockets.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
A proof of concept photo showing mini flags in my beard
Figure 116. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2018 35)
A recent photo from a recent shoot - with flags in my beard.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
A photo of a recent contact sheet from mid March 2018
Figure 117. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2018 36)
A recent photo from a recent shoot - with a paper bag on my head.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe

Research Inspiration Practical

For my latest shoot I focused on closer detail and more creative angles than any of the work so far. I followed my recently documented (figure 102) sketches as my inspiration-driver for the shoot.

A photo of a recent contact sheet from mid March 2018
Figure 110. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2018 31)
A contact sheet from my latest shoot, with a tighter focus on the subject matter.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
A photo of a recent contact sheet from mid March 2018
Figure 111. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2018 32)
Some compositions are more creative than before, all build on the body of work.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe

I also find myself asking of this concept; if to counter to the polished falseness of Social Media presentation of oneself (you know the impeccably groomed/pouty lipped sort), why not shoot this on a smartphone? The answer to this is I guess is because film is my medium of choice nowadays and not much more than that really. Besides, one doesn't need to shoot smartphone to upload to Instagram anyway.

After assessment submission, in taking this work further, I'd be keen to explore an on-location approach to self-portraits similar to what I've seen in Kourtney Roy's work. Though I'm limited in this shoot by the studio setup (by choice), expanding on it would be perhaps be the next step, and it'd certainly open the idea up more and allow another realm of creative direction.

An aside from all that, I rediscovered the work of Jo Spence and her series Narratives and Dis-ease. It strikes me how much she's copied my work. Just kidding... it would appear there are similarities in concept and execution, although with different driving reasons behind them, with Gerry Badger saying in his book, The Genius of Photography, that this work "examined as especially taboo subject - the ageing female body" (Badger, 2014).

A photo of a recent contact sheet from mid March 2018
Figure 112. (Source: Spence, 1990 a)
Jo Spence's series around the perception of ageing female bodies documents a series of self-portraits.
Photo by: Jo Spence
A photo of a recent contact sheet from mid March 2018
Figure 113. (Source: Spence, 1990 b)
The first photograph of Jo Spence's work that I'd ever seen shows her body, altered by surgery, with 'monster' written across it.
Photo by: Jo Spence

Thoughts & Ideas Practical

My latest contact sheets showing the general state of things from my most recent analogue shoot. I'm happy with the results and pleased with the direction things are now taking. I plan to slowly build on the content and continue to upload to Instagram, for the eventual selection of images for submission closer to submission time.

A photo of a recent contact sheet from early March 2018
Figure 107. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2018 28)
Contact sheet part 1 of 2, showing some recent results.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
A photo of a recent contact sheet from early March 2018
Figure 108. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2018 29)
Contact sheet part 2 of 2, showing some recent results.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe

I've sketched out some of the ideas I have for the next shoot which involve more playful poses, experimentation with double exposure, different angles and the use of more props to help build upon and convey the conceptual idea behind this work - the rejection of the carefully manicured portrayal that people hide behind on social media.

A photo of my workbook sketches illustrating thoughts around what to capture for my next shoot
Figure 109. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2018 30)
My next shoot will be guided by these ideas sketched out in my workbook. They detail multiple-exposure, differing poses and tight focus shots and the use of props.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe

Thoughts & Ideas

I've given more thought to how I'll present this body of work for assessment submission ... It occurred to me recently, the idea of producing the images as Instagram style posts, reproduced in my previously mentioned zine, complete with unflattering comments. Then I remember reading unfavourable press about appropriation by artist Richard Prince, who uses other's Instagram content in his work, which just strengthened the idea. Except, my idea is not about appropriation, but relates much more to my concept about self-projection and presentation and how we go about representing ourselves behind masks etc. (detailed on 7th December), which incidentally fits with the Insta-crowd of pouty-faced narcissistic horribles that abound in contemporary times, and my works rejection of such ostentatious beasts.

In practical terms, this means publishing my work on Instagram, gaining likes/comments and so on, then later reviewing these posts with an aim to submit my subjective best (even if with invented comments a la Richard Prince).

I feel as though I'm now 99-100% clear on, not only my concept (detailed on 29th January), but now on the execution of it. Feels good.

Figure 106. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2018 27)
Journal entry detailing my Instagram-style zine thoughts, and how Richard Prince copied me, if not retrospectively.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe

Practical

Some efforts from a shoot last month. One showing some of the frustrations I'm encountering with being off-frame. An issue plaguing some of my shots given the self-portrait nature of this work. I'm finding that despite best efforts in guesstimating framing and composure, things like this happen. While the other is a bit, well, underwhelming. Onwards...

Nonetheless, progress is happening.

Figure 102. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2018 23)
Subject off frame here, unintentionally so. Does it still work? Maybe. Fresh eyes and time will tell.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
Figure 103. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2018 24)
Fairly straight forward, but does it align to my concept? Frustrations abound.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe

On a related aside, I had this roll developed today using a professional lab to gauge any differences in output from my own attempts at home C41 development. I was fully expecting the professional development to be superior, yet to my surprise, the results are quite similar with the professional output producing more artefacts (dirty or old chemistry), making it slightly worse in my opinion. A surprising result - figure 102 is the professional while figure 103 is my own.

Figure 104. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2018 25)
A 100% crop from a roll I had professionally developed shows a similar quality to my own overall, but with my artefacts.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
Figure 105. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2018 26)
A self-developed roll of film cropped to 100% shows little difference in quality to the professionally developed roll seen in figure 97, but with fewer artefacts. I think mine is better.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe

Inspiration Practical

Legendary Seattle music scene rock band photographer Charles Peterson was kind enough to offer me some words of advice to an unsolicited email I'd sent him recently, which was really cool of him. The gist of this was that I should find something I can make my own, that the work should speak for itself and lastly but not least, to break the rules of conventional photography. How awesome, huh?

Figure 99. (Source: Peterson, 1990)
Soundgarden in monochrome by photographer Charles Peterson.
Photo by: Charles Peterson

I also visited The Photographers' Gallery in Soho to see Grayson Perry's Photo Album. I was interested to see his self-portraits, documenting a time in his early 20s, which were both staged and candid.

Figure 100. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2018 21)
The various stages of becoming his alter ego in these photos by Grayson Perry. These shots are interesting for me conceptually and spark ideas of my own.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
Figure 101. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2018 22)
These two photographs by Grayson Perry offer different approaches to documenting oneself - one in motion, the other stationary.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe

Practical

I managed to sort the auto-focusing issue on my Nikon F6 SLR. It turns out, through trial and error, that the lighting from my modelling lamps wasn't adequate to allow the lens to acquire, so was always off. I also discovered that despite setting the camera (Nikon F6) and lens to manual focus, the lens would still try to seek a focal point. Internet searches didn't yield anything useful on the subject (only that older manual focus, pre-AF lenses could be used on the body, which didn't help me but was interesting reading none-the-less), so I searched for the trusty manual and discovered I had to go into the rudimentary menu and switch off all auto-focusing all together. This allowed me to manually focus without the lens overriding on a half-shutter press. However, this manual focus meant I had to revert to placing an object into the scene to focus on (see figure 86), before then removing it and placing myself into the scene, again. The very reason I switched to 35mm from 4x5 in the first place was to avoid needing to do this. Regardless, sticking with 35mm for the adaptability of a zoom lens over a prime lens on the 4x5 means I'll pursue this avenue after all. Anyway, that problem is now resolved.

As for the colour variation ... If this had been digital, I'd suspect that this issue could be caused by frequency interference of the overhead ceiling lighting causing the censor to interpret the colour differently, but as this is film, it's only a guess.

Figure 93. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2018 15)
The stand with the balloon attached is an approximation of my height, while the balloon stands in for where my head would be in relation. This method allowed me to focus on the pole and frame my shot.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
Figure 94. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2018 16)
Camera gear used on the shoot. A DSLR for testing composition, an SLR for the actual shooting, two lenses; a 24-70mm and 70-200mm, my notebook, film and receivers.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe

I also produced some contact sheets based on a sample of the images I've shot. These will guide me in refining and improving on what I've already done and in highlighting what works and what doesn't. Figures 88 and 89 where shot entirely in digital as a quicker proof-of-concept approach whereas figures 90 and 91 where shot on film as I'd felt happy enough with my initial approaches to justify the move to the medium of choice.

Figure 95. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2018 17)
The first contact sheet printed after my initial test shoot in digital. This work demonstrates early-idea execution, lighting and just general composition and framing - note the backdrop supports in the first and last shot.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
Figure 96. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2018 18)
My second round of test shooting where I continue to try out ideas, identifying what looks good and what doesn't.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
Figure 97. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2018 19)
This contact sheet, with photos taken on film, shows some notes on ideas and elements that I think work well, which I will elaborate on further.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
Figure 98. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2018 20)
More analogue photos demonstrating some variation in my concept.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe

Practical

I'm currently very frustrated with my progress ... I'd set aside some days this week to get my mini studio setup in the lounge room while my wife and kids were away. A perfect opportunity to set up, spread out and shoot. But I've run into troubles ... the film isn't turning out as expected nor has it been smooth sailing technically speaking.

For practicality reasons, I decided to shoot using 35mm rather than 4x5 large format, as this way, I'd be able to use a remote shutter to have the lens focus on me while in the frame. Whereas with the large format manual lenses, I'd have needed to pre-focus on something in the approximate area of where I would be situated, and then get in the scene, remove whatever it is I used to focus on, and then trigger the shutter using a long shutter release cable.

So, in using the 35mm camera, I at first set out to compose and test shoot using digital first. I did this for a few reasons. The first being that as I was shooting myself, I would have had no frame of reference in composing the scene. This allowed me to frame as I thought would suit, then get in the scene fire of a test shot, come back and review it and adjust accordingly. So, by setting my DSLR to a shutter delay of 5 or 10 seconds and using a remote, I would approximate myself in the frame, focus using a half-press of the shutter button on the remote in order to have the lens focus on me, fire, and then go over and review my shot. Repeating until I had honed my position etc. The plan was then at this point, to switch out the DSLR for my SLR and replicate the successful scene. Straight forward enough huh? Wrong.

Somewhere between taking the shot using exactly the same shutter remote, photos came out out-of-focus, suggesting the lens had failed to acquire me. Worse still is that frames on the same roll of film would expose differently, despite a continuity of ISO, shutter, aperture, lighting, remote shutter setup as well as the film being fresh i.e. non-expired film. Of course, as is the nature with film, these issues only come to light once developed, which is all very time consuming and very frustrating, given the circumstances of my approach to the shoot.

So, my problems are thus - film and precious time. The later in that the available time to me to setup my mini studio again and shoot ... I can't do that with the kids about. And the former, the apparent problems with the film. Do I revert to using digital after all? Or do I try again? Focus issues aside (which I'll resolve by reverting to manually focusing), the colour variations really perplex me. I can only assume that is a flash sync issue ...

Figure 88. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2018 10)
An out-of-focus test shot. The lens was unable to acquire the subject on auto-focus due to inadequate lighting. Frustrating to discover only after developing the roll of film.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
Figure 89. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2018 11)
The same roll of film and the same settings produced a colour variation that differs from figure 84. Not sure why.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe

On a less-stressful development related note, I've jotted down ideas around what I wanted to shoot, based on ideas born of my investigations into the works of other photographers, painters and other creative artists.

Figure 90. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2018 12)
Thoughts and ideas to shoot for my project. Note also the colour wheel - an idea to try and align complementary colours wherever possible.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
Figure 91. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2018 13)
A production line of items to shoot and ideas to try.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
Figure 92. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2018 14)
A digital and analogue test shoot.
Video by: Evan Skuthorpe

Inspiration

Some inspiration in the form of self portaits by Kourtney Roy and portraits of others by David Stewart.

Figure 87. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2018 9)
Portraits by Kourtney Roy and David Stewart.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe

Research Inspiration Thoughts & Ideas

In recent days, my concept has finalised. Due of course, to my epiphany-like realisation that I always find myself focusing on the how-I'll-shoot-something-using-a-certain-camera or with an OCD-like everything-must-be-shot-on-XYZ-film-on-an-XYZ-camera, rather than just a focus on the concept itself. I.e. the 'why', what does it mean, why am I doing this, what's significant etc. The what-is-my-concept approach. For what it's worth, the medium of choice, the technical stuff ... the audience, they don't really give a shit what something was shot on. They just want to look at the images and go, "oh cool, nice idea".

Only the fanboy's will care that something was shot on Kodak something-or-other 400 large format sheet film, and there's nothing wrong with that, it's just not the reason a work was created. I doubt Moriyama ever shot something because he wanted to use a certain camera, I'll bet the choice of camera just followed the idea, and was probably a practical choice too.

Granted, my choice was to use film, but is this actually crucial to the work? Perhaps not.

So, the finalisation is in my head. The 'what' and 'why' is now arrived at. Hallelujah!

Figure 84. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2018 6)
Thoughts from yesterday on my project and how I need to stop focusing on the execution, i.e. the camera format, and focus on the concept.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
Figure 85. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2018 7)
Inspiration in the form of photographs by Emily Kinni and Tobias Zielony.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
Figure 86. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2018 8)
My concept is arrived at - the self-censoring will all do.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe

Research Practical

Yesterday I conducted a test shoot using my 4x5 large format camera, shooting 2 sheets of expired Kodak Ektachrome 64 film (only one of which is seen below), and one fresh sheet of Kodak Portra 400. My results are mixed.

I shot figure 81 by first framing the shot and then placing a whisky bottle on the table, to be able to pre-focus, approximately, where my leg would be. Using an aperture of 5.6 at 1/15s, I primed the lens; removed the dark slide; removed the whisky bottle; and while holding the shutter release cable, stood on the table; then exposed my shot.

I decided to try the fresh Portra film in case the expired Ektachrome film didn't work out. In my haste, I took note of the position of the table and moved it out of the way before standing where it had been, then exposed the shot. In hindsight, I should have reframed and refocused the shot first. As you can see from figure 82, it's out-of-focus for the most part. A stupid error but one I hopefully won't make again. I also note that I will need to adjust the rear of the camera to be level with the subject; as the camera is pointed downward, only a thin sliver is in focus.

I also note rubber band markings on the negatives, which can be seen running vertically in these images, results from the 'taco method' of sheet film development, even though the emulsion side was facing inward and had no direct contact with the band. I've read that using hair bands circumvents this issue so will try that next time.

I also researched whether I could get my large format lenses to sync with my flash lights, and I can! I searched online and found out how, so my next step will be to do a second round of test shooting to see what light settings I'll require. I'll first test on my DSLR replicating the same film speed with the aim of establishing a suitable shutter and aperture for the large format lens, before then shooting a properly focused sheet of film, probably in black and white, as it suits this purpose, and saves the pennies. Once successful, I'll keep record of my settings and then proceed with colour film again.

Figure 81. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2018 3)
A expired sheet of Ektachrome 64 film shot, developed and scanned. Exposed at 1/8s, ISO 64, developed for 30 seconds longer than recommended. Despite having expired in 1989, it seems to only have a slight yellow tinge variation to it.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
Figure 82. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2018 4)
A terrible photograph that is out-of-focus with an unpleasing combination of natural light (left-hand-side) and artificial light (right-hand-side). Though the colours are great.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
Figure 83. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2018 5)
Large format test shoot.
Video by: Evan Skuthorpe

Research Inspiration Thoughts & Ideas

As my thoughts continue to evolve, I've noted some ideas down for possible props that could accompany the portraits (figure 79) while the work of Annelie Vandendael inspires (figure 80).

Figure 79. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2018 1)
Some props listed that might accompany my shoot.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
Figure 80. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2018 2)
Portraits by Annelie Vandendael inspire for their creativity.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe

Research Inspiration

I encountered some wonderful work by the late photographer Ren Hang who produced this series of portraits. I like the simplicity in subject, lighting and backdrop, something that I'm aiming for with this project. I plan to begin test shooting soon.

Figure 78. (Source: Hang, 2014)
Portraits by photographer Ren Hang inspire and delight.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe

Research Inspiration

Today I visited the Tate Modern to view their permanent collection of Daido Moriyama work. I also encountered some portraits by Larry Sultan and Mike Mandel and another by Zanele Muholi

Figure 71. (Source: Sultan and Mandel, n.d. a)
Portrait by Larry Sultan and Mike Mandel.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
Figure 72. (Source: Sultan and Mandel, n.d. b)
Portrait by Larry Sultan and Mike Mandel.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
Figure 73. (Source: Sultan and Mandel, n.d. c)
Portrait by Larry Sultan and Mike Mandel.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
Figure 74. (Source: Moriyama, n.d. a)
A collection of Daido Moriyama's work.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
Figure 75. (Source: Moriyama, n.d. b)
A collection of Daido Moriyama's work.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
Figure 76. (Source: Moriyama, n.d. c)
A collection of Daido Moriyama's work.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
Figure 77. (Source: Muholi, 2003)
ID Crisis (2003) and Bra (2003) from Only Half the Picture by Zanele Muholi.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe

Thoughts & Ideas

Some workbook notations exploring my thoughts on conceptual approach and why/what I'm trying to convey with this project (figure 64) while thoughts on how the images might be presented in a gallery space (figure 65).

Figure 69. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 64)
Notes on my evolving concept. The project should be representative of me.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
Figure 70. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 65)
Presentation ideas crudley sketched out, where I envisage my portrait-aspect photos divided into thirds.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe

Research Inspiration

More inspiration in the form of three portraits I've encountered recently. Nakedness and colour, post-photography creative working and powerful composition are the key elements I take from these.

Figure 66. (Source: unknown, n.d.)
The strong bold colours and naked figure are striking.
Artwork by: unknown artist
Figure 67. (Source: unknown, n.d.)
The creative use of post-production artistic license overlayed onto the portrait is also quite striking.
Artwork by: unknown artist
Figure 68. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 63)
A Constructivist photo from the Red Star Over Russia exhibition brings ideas of tight composition and differing angles. Photographer unknown.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe

Research Inspiration

Seated portraiture paintings for inspiration.

Figure 63. (Source: Scott, 1939)
Seated Nude 1939, by William Scott.
Artwork by: William Scott
Figure 64. (Source: Fougeron, 1953)
Return from the Market 1953, by André Fougeron.
Artwork by: André Fougeron
Figure 65. (Source: Modigliani, 1916)
Jean Cocteau 1916, by Amedeo Modigliani.
Artwork by: Amedeo Modigliani

Research Inspiration Thoughts & Ideas

I discovered photographer Amy Luo and her series Stills from Lens Culture's Exposure Awards 2017, some of which can be seen in figures 59 and 60. I think to myself if I can get by using plain backgrounds or whether I need something more, like textured backdrops and detailed objects.

Figure 61. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 61)
Stills by Amy Luo - a series of indoor portraits displaying what I feel is a sense of solitude.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
Figure 62. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 62)
More of Stills by Amy Luo - an inspirational body of work.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe

Research Inspiration Thoughts & Ideas Practical

Yesterday, I managed to head back to Process Supplies and pick up a suitable thermometer (and also a 1200ml measuring cylinder and extra drying clips), so today I just attempted my first C41 colour film development. The trickiest part was first getting the developer to the correct temperature then maintaining that. They're currently drying so we'll see when I scan them, but if these comes out well, I'll be developing my own C41 colour film for the project! Exciting times.

Figure 56. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 56)
Developing C41 for the first time.
Video by: Evan Skuthorpe

I've also further developed my thinking around the test shots that I've done so far, notes in figure 53, while further inspiration for my self-portrait route is detailed in figure 52. I hope to introduce some fun into this body of work.

Figure 57. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 57)
Some inspiration for my self-portraits from Edwin Wurm and Thomas Ruff bring a sense of the atypical, in the form of silliness and humour.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
Figure 58. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 58)
An evaluation of my three format approaches thus far - Polaroid instant film, medium-format and large-format .
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
Figure 59. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 59)
These workbook sketches illustrate ideas for my self-portraits, and also notes on how to execute them with a production line style approach, switching props in and out.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe

With this inspiration in mind, I also conducted a quick test (as quick as setting up a 4x5 camera can be) to see what a double exposure might look like. My light meter gave me a reading of 1s at f8 so I halved that to 1/2s and shot the scene twice, the first time with me in it, the second with just the empty scene. It's definitely something I'll try a few more times.

A black and white double-exposure photograph shot on large format camera in a 5x4 aspect ratio. The scene is a home office with the ghostly sillhouette of a man sat in an office chair, leaning over his desk.
Figure 60. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 60)
A development issue aside, where I accidentally allowed ambient light to leak in after placing the negative in the Patterson development tank (along the top), I shot a quick and dirty 5x4 double exposure to see how this might look. I'm happy with it so might investigate multiple exposures further.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe

Practical

I picked up some 1 litre Winchester bottles from Process Supplies today, so now I can mix and store my C41 chemicals that I took delivery of the other day. I planned to do that tonight but discovered my thermometer only goes to 30 degrees Celsius, whereas I need my chemistry at 38 degrees Celsius. I'll need to find another one.

Figure 54. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 54)
My new Winchester bottles!
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
Figure 55. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 55)
My new C41 chemicals, awaiting mixing!
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe

Inspiration Thoughts & Ideas Practical

I ordered a C41 home development kit today, a Fuji Hunt C41 X-Press 5L Kit, so I can learn to develop colour film at home, should arrive early next week. This is so I can shoot and develop my own colour films for the project, removing the inevitable delay in waiting for a lab to develop, not to mention the hassle in dropping off and collection of my film. Longer term cost effectiveness should also help keep costs down.

I also noted my recent idea about producing a self-published booklet or zine of the resulting photography from this project. My ideas are to make three copies, all self-produced on the cheap and assembled myself and left about London, signed, dated and numbered - ending up in the bin probably ...

Figure 53. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 53)
Workbook writings detailing my thoughts on producing a zine, of sorts, at the end of it all, with examples by Jason Larkin's Platinum and Edward Ruscha's Twentysix Gasoline Stations.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe

Research Inspiration Thoughts & Ideas Practical

Figure 42. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 42)
Nadav Kander's Dark Line - The Thames Estuary at the Flowers Gallery.
Video by: Evan Skuthorpe

I visited the Flowers Gallery today to see the an exhibition called Dark Line - The Thames Estuary by Nadav Kander. I wanted to see this because his work along the river is both mystical and intriguing and aligns with my own thoughts around shooting self-portraits in places of isolation. His work is very good, obviously.

I find the crop very interesting as it creates a sense of uniqueness, given the subject has been shot before. He also appears to break each image into three vertical slices, removing the middle slice, which can be seen to good effect in figure 39 and 40. His apparent use of early and late light with longer exposures seems to be what gives the quality to this body of work. He presents the work alongside found items which are displayed in pools of water with minimal lighting to highlight the object within (figure 41).

Figure 43. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 43)
Nadav Kander's work in the series Dark Line - The Thames Estuary.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
Figure 44. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 44)
Nadav Kander's work in the series Dark Line - The Thames Estuary.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
Figure 45. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 45)
Nadav Kander's work in the series Dark Line - The Thames Estuary.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
Figure 46. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 46)
Nadav Kander's work in the series Dark Line - The Thames Estuary.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe

I also finally managed to get out and use a working Polaroid camera today. I wandered around the Bethnal Green area and built up the courage to ask strangers if I could photograph them, and below are the results. On reflection, I like them, they have an imperfect quality to them but I'm not sure others will appreciate them. Perhaps I'll leave them and come back to them in a few days to see if they grab me and what thoughts I might have about how to take this approach forward. I managed to shoot only four people so will need to build on this to get a better feel for the approach regardless.

I'd be interested to see what my tutor thinks about these. I feel as though they're not as strong as the medium format black and white shots I've done already, but they do have something about them. Speaking of which, I need to build on that content using colour negatives, which I think will make that approach a strong contender for taking forward.

I need to revisit my concept and focus less on the format too.

Figure 47. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 47)
My first Polaroid test shot - Andy.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
Figure 48. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 48)
Andy volunteered himself for more poses, so I obliged.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
Figure 49. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 49)
His manoeuvres gave me some ideas on how I might position my subjects. Afterall, this was a test shoot.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
Figure 50. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 50)
My second Polaroid test shot - another Andy, who I was passing in the street. A more detailed background distracts from the subject.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
Figure 51. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 51)
My third Polaroid test shot - Muhamed, a bar tender. I quite like the distinction between subject and background.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
Figure 52. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 52)
My fourth Polaroid test shot - Richard, a photographer. The shot was blurry due to low light and camera shake from the cold.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe

Practical

Today I scanned the negatives I developed yesterday and shot on the 22nd November, and I can see that the idea isn't really coming together yet. The large background subject distracts from the main focus, the person (me). Though I do like the two-tone colours of the jacket and jeans contrasting with the background tones. I don't like the fact my clothes have creases which is accentuated by the natural light. The composition with the model to the right, the upward sloping ground and my arm out to the right holding the shutter release cable all don't quite work on reflection.

Proceeding from here, my initial thoughts are that I need to consider the attire I'd wear, a more centred composition and a more refined pose. I think crucially, I'd also need to shoot locations that better suit, perhaps superimposing a second exposure of myself in post-production, but I don't think this is where I want to go with this body of work. Hmmm ...

Some more thought needed.

Figure 41. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 41)
A 4x5 test shoot proof of concept.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe

Practical

I developed 2 of the 6 large format negatives I'd shot on the 22nd November using Ilfosol 3 developer. The work had been shot on Ilford HP5 400 for cost and ease-of-development reasons, for quicker evaluation than if they'd been shot in colour, not to mention far greater costs. The development process went well with the negatives coming up really nicely which is always a bonus. I'd developed plenty of medium format and 35 mm negatives before, even 8x10 negatives, but these were the first at the 4x5 size I'd ever shot and developed.

Figure 40. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 40)
Washing 4x5 negatives from a test shoot.
Video by: Evan Skuthorpe

Practical

My Polaroid camera arrived yesterday so I headed out to do some test shots with a cartridge of Polaroid Originals Color 600 Film around Kings Cross. I ended up around Saint Pancras and Pentonville mostly. I took along my Hasselblad for good measure to further develop that avenue but only ended up with one more shot that I figured might work, pending development of the film. I also found that my new Polaroid was faulty - it wouldn't eject any film and then sporadically did so only after collapsing it down and opening it back up. Whatever the issue was, the first four frames didn't appear to have been exposed to light during that hiccup. I'd only discovered the issue after asking a woman in the street if she wouldn't mind me taking her photograph. I explained my project and what I was doing, and she was kind enough to follow my instructions. Thankfully she was patient but as the problem with the Polaroid persisted, I let her go on her way. Later in the afternoon, the last four frames did expose and eject fine, but I was making arrangements to have the camera swapped.

It was also very cold, so I ended up in a few pubs to compensate ... no real progress made today.

Figure 39. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 39)
Four blank negatives and four exposed negatives from my first cartridge of Polaroid Originals Color 600 Film.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe

Research Thoughts & Ideas Practical

Figure 33. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 33)
Workbook notes on how I might continue the large format avenue - setting up on location and asking if passing strangers wouldn't mind having their photos taken.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
Figure 34. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 34)
A note (on the left) on a product to consider after researching a little about developing my own colour film, should I end up pursuing that route with this project. It will help keep development costs down.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe

Today I scanned the medium format negatives I'd developed yesterday (Fomapan 100) and the pic of the bunch are here to see. I like them. What I gain from reviewing these is, that although I think they're good, I probably need to try shooting more with people looking directly at the lens to build that connection between subject and reader. It's something to investigate as I believe it will make the work better. We'll see.

I enjoyed shooting these particular photographs as I'd built up a rapport of sorts with the subjects I shot. I've had a fear probably common to many photographers, and that's approaching and photographing strangers, but on this outing, it came naturally and these kind folks all consented. It's a nice step in my personal development as a photographer.

I wonder, should I shoot in colour? And should it be colour negatives or positives? I think colour will bring something extra to this work if I end up pursuing it. On a side note, really pleased with the Fomapan film.

Figure 35. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 35)
This is Tiarne, photographed 24 Nov 2017 on Red Lion Street. I noticed her through the window and gestured for a photo. I quite like the glass reflections between subject and camera, and her off-camera stare.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
Figure 36. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 36)
This is Adam, photographed 24 Nov 2017 in Red Lion Square. The shot is dark but nothing that couldn't be edited out in the darkroom, or digitally.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
Figure 37. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 37)
This is Nick, photographed 24 Nov 2017 on Eagle Street. He's on his phone, drawing on a vape. I like the seated composition.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
Figure 38. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 38)
This is Avtar, photographed 24 Nov 2017 on the corner of St. Cross Street and Hatton Garden. If I'd composed a little lower, it would have been better.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe

Thoughts & Ideas

Thoughts and notes on my evolving concept - with less of a focus on East End 'people', and instead, just 'people'.

Figure 32. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 32)
Musings jotted down in my workbook about the concept at hand. What am I trying to shoot?
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe.

Research Inspiration

I chanced upon a photographer called Robert Doisneau in a second-hand bookstore in the West End today. The book contains a wonderful series of portraits and general street scenes. I liked his work immediately, particularly in the context of photographing people as a subject matter.

Figure 27. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 27)
A great family portrait makes up the front cover of Robert Doisneau's book.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe.
Figure 28. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 28)
A portrait of a woman and her dogs. It contains a wonderful series of portraits and general street scenes.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe.
Figure 29. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 29)
A wonderfully casual and vulnerable shot.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe.
Figure 30. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 30)
Great tonal range and subject matter.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe.

Doisneau's work reminded me of August Sander's Face of Our Time and so I dug out my copy to take it in again.

Figure 31 (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 31)
August Sander's Face of Our Time is a magnificent work I derive inspiration from.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe

Research Inspiration Thoughts & Ideas

Today I visited the Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize 2017 exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery and later visited Austin Desmond Fine Art gallery to see some works by Keith Vaughan entitled On Pagham Beach, Photographs and Collages from the 1930s, for inspiration.

I wanted to see portraiture styles by other photographers I wasn't necessarily familiar with and so Keith Vaughan's work fitted that bill perfectly, as did the finalists to the Taylor Wessing exhibition. The photograph below of monochrome head and shoulders (figure 19), with tight focus, almost profile, makes great use of directional lighting.

Figure 21. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 21)
A head and shoulders portrait by Keith Vaughan on display in the Austin Desmond Fine Art gallery.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe.
Figure 22. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 22)
A full body nude portrait by Keith Vaughan on display in the Austin Desmond Fine Art gallery.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe.
Figure 23. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 23)
A portrait by Catherine Hyland from her series Wait-and-See Pudding with Patience Sauce, on display at the National Portrait Gallery while the Taylor Wessing prize shows.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe.
Figure 24. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 24)
Owen Harvey's series entitled Skins & Suedes, on display at the National Portrait Gallery while the Taylor Wessing prize shows.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe.
Figure 25. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 25)
'Padding, 16, Irish Traveller, Liverpool' by photographer Craig Easton from his series Sixteen, on display at the National Portrait Gallery while the Taylor Wessing prize shows.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe.
Figure 26. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 26)
'BEAR' Brown from the series In Trump Country by photographer Richard Beaven, on display at the National Portrait Gallery while the Taylor Wessing prize shows.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe.

Practical

I ventured out to get a few test shots at a location along the Thames that I'd decided on beforehand. I'd also been sure to check the tide times to make sure I'd be visiting at low tide.

I took along three film dark slides so I could capture 5 shots (I'd exposed one already at home) and made use of all, trying some slightly different poses to see what might work best.

Figure 20. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 20)
A snap of my 4x5 large format camera on location for my first test shoot.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe.

Thoughts & Ideas

Figure 19. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 19)
Workbook notes detailing my attempts to refine my concept.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe.

My notebook entry details thoughts on location and subject, such as Hyde Park to capture people walking their dogs, and Parliament Hill in Hampstead Heath for portraits with city scape backdrops.


Practical

Today I scanned in the Fuji Instax films I shot yesterday. They're very soft but as expected from a plastic lens. The film has a lovely colour quality but overall not best suited to enlarging given how soft everything all is.

Figure 16. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 16)
A passing portrait of two men while wandering Soho.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe.
Figure 17. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 17)
A portrait from behind as two men pass by.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
Figure 18. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 18)
A video of Wim Wenders' Polaroids.
Video by: Evan Skuthorpe.

Research Inspiration Practical

I visited the Instant Stories. Wim Wenders' Polaroids exhibition at The Photographers' Gallery today. I wanted to explore my concepts around portraiture using less-common mediums and so the Polaroid format immediately came to mind with this and in research photographer Dash Snow for my studies.

Today I also purchased a Lomo camera as a cheaper alternative to a Polaroid. This camera uses Fuji Instax brand instant film, also cheaper than both Polaroid Originals film and Impossible Project film. I went for a wander through Soho to do a test shoot after visiting The Photographers' Gallery. Updates soon, once I scan those in.

Figure 11. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 11)
A video of Wim Wenders' Polaroids.
Video by: Evan Skuthorpe.
Figure 12. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 12)
A portrait by Wim Wenders shot on Polaroid film.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe.
Figure 13. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 13)
A series of street scenes by Wim Wenders.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
Figure 14. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 14)
A series of closeup shots of a man's face.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe.
Figure 15. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 15)
A street scene by Wim Wenders.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe

Inspiration Thoughts & Ideas

I gained some more inspiration around possible locations after seeing Brooklyn Bridge, New York by Walker Evans.

Figure 10. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 10)
Setting up my large format camera on location.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe.

Research Thoughts & Ideas

My workbook notes further exploring ideas around concept and the use of equipment. I'd discovered work by photographer Jason Lee where he used large format Polaroid film. I also came across a Kickstarter campaign that catered to the use of Fuji Instax film in Hasselblad 500 series cameras backs.

My researched Polaroid films and Fujifilm FP-100C instant film before deciding to look into Fuji Instax film further.

Figure 9. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 9)
Notes detailing possible equipment and creative approaches to my project.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe.

Research Inspiration Thoughts & Ideas

I've begun to research some location ideas for my self-portrait concept. I used Google Maps and my own knowledge to narrow down my ideas of areas that might suit the large-format setup, without getting in the way of other people, in turn allowing me to shoot in peace.

Figure 8. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 8)
Notes in my workbook documenting location ideas, and an image for inspiration from photographer Nico Goodden.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe.

Inspiration Thoughts & Ideas

I've evolved my thoughts around the concept slightly (figure 6) as well as had ideas on composition and the use of format - either large or medium (figure 7).

Figure 6. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 6)
Notes documenting evolving thought around my self-portrait concept - a photographic study of anxiety and isolation.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe
Figure 7. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 7)
These notes detail further thought on how to shoot the self-portrait concept, with reference to a Robert Mapplethorpe photo. The use of an extra-long shutter release cable would allow me to execute the shots needed.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe.

Thoughts & Ideas

My workbook details an idea around how I would compose and focus a shot for my self-portrait concept, including a sketch on how I envisage this to look and the use of large format.

Figure 5. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 5)
Workbook notes on an idea for how to execute a shot.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe.

Thoughts & Ideas

Figure 4. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 4)
Mind-mapped notes in my workbook detail my very initial thoughts.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe.

I noted some initial thoughts around potential subject matter, location and format for discussion with my tutor and for later contemplation. These include shooting at locations in London, either a fine-art or documentary approach, in analogue and with a focus on people - either other people or self-portraiture.


Research Inspiration Thoughts & Ideas

I went to see Thomas Ruff: Photographs 1979-2017 at the Whitechapel Gallery today. Seeing the exhibition has helped me to start formulating ideas around what I might do for with this body of work. I took photographs of the work and of the descriptions to refer back to later, some of which are below.

Figure 1. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 1)
Thomas Ruff shot portraits of his friends for this body of work. I really admire the uniform approach he's undertaken, and composition used.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe.
Figure 2. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 2)
A work called Houses by Ruff in which he photographed buildings in Düsseldorf between 1950s-70s.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe.
Figure 3. (Source: Skuthorpe, 2017 3)
A piece called Press++ in which Ruff took press proof images and blended the notations and markings from the reverse side onto them.
Photo by: Evan Skuthorpe.

References

  • Badger, G. (2014) The Genius of Photography. London: Quadrille Publishing Limited

List of Illustrations

  • Fougeron, A. (1953) Return from the Market [Painting]. Available at: https://www.facebook.com/tategallery/photos/a.117432718992.113215.20134383992/10156056775428993/?type=3&theater [Accessed: 17 December, 2017]
  • Hang, R. (2014) Photograph of works by Ren Hang in my workbook. Unpublished.
  • Marusic, S. (n.d. a) untitled [photograph]. Available at: http://www.sanjamarusic.nl/gallery/single-images-1718/ [Accessed: 16 March, 2018]
  • Marusic, S. (n.d. b) untitled [photograph]. Available at: http://www.sanjamarusic.nl/gallery/figures-under-the-sun-2/ [Accessed: 16 March, 2018]
  • Modigliani, A. (1916) Jean Cocteau [Painting]. Available at: https://www.facebook.com/tategallery/photos/a.117432718992.113215.20134383992/10156068714373993/?type=3&theater [Accessed: 19 December, 2017]
  • Moriyama, D. (n.d. a) Photograph of Daido Moriyama permanent collection, Tate Modern. Unpublished.
  • Moriyama, D. (n.d. b) Photograph of Daido Moriyama permanent collection, Tate Modern. Unpublished.
  • Moriyama, D. (n.d. c) Photograph of Daido Moriyama permanent collection, Tate Modern. Unpublished.
  • Muholi, Z. (2003) Photograph of work by Zanele Muholi, Tate Modern. Unpublished.
  • Scott, W. (1939) Seated Nude [Painting]. Available at: https://www.facebook.com/tategallery/photos/a.117432718992.113215.20134383992/10156057236308993/?type=3&theater [Accessed: 16 December, 2017]
  • Peterson, C. (1990) Soundgarden [photograph]. Available at: https://www.charlespeterson.net/grunge [Accessed: 12 March, 2018]
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 1) Photograph of Thomas Ruff exhibition. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 2) Photograph of Thomas Ruff exhibition. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 3) Photograph of Thomas Ruff exhibition. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 4) Photograph of workbook notes. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 5) Photograph of workbook notes. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 6) Photograph of workbook notes. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 7) Photograph of workbook notes showing a photo by Robert Mapplethorpe. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 8) Photograph of workbook notes showing a photo by Nico Goodden. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 9) Photograph of workbook notes showing a Polaroid back for Hasselblad cameras and a Kickstarter product. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 10) Photograph of workbook notes showing a photo by Walker Evans. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 11) Video of Wim Wenders' Polaroids in a gallery. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 12) Photograph of a Wim Wenders' Polaroid. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 13) Photograph of Polaroids by Wim Wenders. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 14) Photograph of Polaroids by Wim Wenders. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 15) Photograph of a Wim Wenders' Polaroid. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 16) Photograph of an Instax print showing two men looking down the lens. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 17) Photograph of an Instax print showing two men walking away. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 18) Video of Instax prints from a test shoot. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 19) Photograph of workbook notes. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 20) Photograph a large format camera. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 21) Photograph of a head and shoulders portait by Keith Vaughan. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 22) Photograph of a male nude in shadow by Keith Vaughan. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 23) Photograph from the series Wait-and-See Pudding with Patience Sauce by Catherine Hyland. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 24) Photograph from the series Skins & Suedes by Owen Harvey. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 25) Photograph of 'Paddy' Brown from the series Sixteen by Craig Easton. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 26) Photograph of 'Bear' Brown from the series In Trump Country by Richard Beaven. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 27) Photograph of the cover of a Robert Dioisneau book. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 28) Photograph of a page in a book showing a portrait by Robert Dioisneau. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 29) Photograph of a page in a book showing a portrait by Robert Dioisneau. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 30) Photograph of a page in a book showing a portrait by Robert Dioisneau. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 31) Photograph of the cover of August Sander's Face of Our Time book. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 32) Photograph of workbook notes. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 33) Photograph of workbook notes. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 34) Photograph of workbook notes. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 35) Photograph of a woman. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 36) Photograph of a seated man. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 37) Photograph of a smoking man. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 38) Photograph of a man. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 39) Photograph of Polaroids from a test shoot. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 40) Video of large format negatives being developed. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 41) Self-portrait photograph. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 42) Video of Nadav Kander's Dark Lines - The Thames Estuary exhibition at the Flowers Gallery. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 43) Photograph of Nadav Kander's Dark Lines - The Thames Estuary exhibition at the Flowers Gallery. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 44) Photograph of Nadav Kander's Dark Lines - The Thames Estuary exhibition at the Flowers Gallery. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 45) Photograph of Nadav Kander's Dark Lines - The Thames Estuary exhibition at the Flowers Gallery. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 46) Photograph of Nadav Kander's Dark Lines - The Thames Estuary exhibition at the Flowers Gallery. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 47) Portrait of a man with a hat 1. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 48) Portrait of a man with a hat 2. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 49) Portrait of a man with a hat 3. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 50) Portrait of a man in the street. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 51) Portrait of a barman. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 52) Portrait of a photographer. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 53) Photograph of workbook notes detailing inspiration for final presentation. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 54) Photograph of darkroom chemical bottles. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 55) Photograph of darkroom chemicals. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 56) Video of C41 development. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 57) Photograph of workbook notes around prints by Edwin Wurm and Thomas Ruff. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 58) Photograph of workbook with my own photographic prints. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 59) Photograph of workbook notes detailing potential shots. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 60) Large format double exposure photograph. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 61) Photographs of workbook notes showing thoughts around prints by Amy Luo. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 62) Photographs of workbook notes showing thoughts around prints by Amy Luo. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 63) Photograph of a portrait showing at the Tate Modern's Red Star Over Russia exhibit. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 64) Photograph of workbook notes detailing concept. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2017 65) Photograph of workbook notes detailing presentation. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2018 1) Photograph of workbook notes. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2018 2) Photograph of workbook with prints by Annelie Vandendael. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2018 3) Large format photograph test shot. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2018 4) Large format photograph test shot. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2018 5) Video of large format test shoot. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2018 6) Photograph of workbook notes detailing concept thoughts. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2018 7) Photograph of workbook with prints by Emily Kinni and Tobias Zielony. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2018 8) Photograph of workbook notes detailing concept thoughts. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2018 9) Photograph of workbook notes with prints by Kourtney Roy and David Stewart. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2018 10) Self-portrait. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2018 11) Self-portrait. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2018 12) Photograph of workbook notes detailing shoot ideas. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2018 13) Photograph of workbook notes detailing shoot ideas. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2018 14) Video of test shoot. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2018 15) Photograph of studio setup. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2018 16) Photograph of cameras and lenses. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2018 17) Photograph of contact sheets. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2018 18) Photograph of contact sheets. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2018 19) Photograph of contact sheets. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2018 20) Photograph of contact sheets. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2018 21) Photograph of Grayson Perry's Photo Album exhibit. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2018 22) Photograph of Grayson Perry's Photo Album exhibit. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2018 23) Self-portrait. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2018 24) Self-portrait. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2018 25) Scan of lab-developed negative. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2018 26) Scan of self-developed negative. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2018 27) Photograph of workbook notes detailing presentation idea. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2018 28) Photograph of contact sheets. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2018 29) Photograph of contact sheets. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2018 30) Photograph of workbook notes detailing shoot ideas. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2018 31) Photograph of contact sheets. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2018 32) Photograph of contact sheets. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2018 33) Self-portrait. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2018 34) Self-portrait. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2018 35) Self-portrait. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2018 36) Self-portrait. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2018 37) Photograph of workbook notes detailing shoot ideas. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2018 38) Photograph of contact sheets. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2018 39) Photograph of contact sheets. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2018 40) Self-portrait. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2018 41) Self-portrait. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2018 42) Self-portrait. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2018 43) Self-portrait. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2018 44) Self-portrait. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2018 45) Contact sheets. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2018 46) Contact sheets. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2018 47) Contact sheets. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2018 48) Final submission mock-up. Unpublished.
  • Skuthorpe, E. (2018 49) Sketches detailing zine idea. Unpublished.
  • Spence, J. (1990 a) Greedy [photograph]. Available at: http://www.jospence.org/narratives_of_disease/n_o_d_1.html [Accessed: 12 March, 2018]
  • Spence, J. (1990 b) Exiled [photograph]. Available at: http://www.jospence.org/narratives_of_disease/n_o_d_3.html [Accessed: 12 March, 2018]
  • Sultan, L. and Mandel, M. (c.1977 a) Spacesuit wearing person doing push-ups. Unpublished.
  • Sultan, L. and Mandel, M. (c.1977 b) Man wearing undergarments. Unpublished.
  • Sultan, L. and Mandel, M. (c.1977 c) Man standing on a platform. Unpublished.