For the sake of posterity.

In future we'll look back at these and smile, or laugh, at how primitive it all was - the fashion, the shops, modes of transport, even the street signs and traffic lights. I've always been an historian. Photographs that incidentally document a time, whether conceptually or otherwise, have always held fascination for me. Contemporary photos will be old too, one day.

The view eastward down Commercial Road in the East End of London, obscured by a passing vehicle.
untitled. c.2018.
Published: 15 Jul 2018 | Updated:

With the explosion in amateur photography at the very dawn of this millennium, thanks to the emergence of mass-market digital compact cameras, followed closely by the birth of social media, and the almost-overnight sensation of smartphone technology in the latter half of the first decade, our contemporary photographic age is now largely a cacophony of visual noise - often overwhelming and underwhelming all at once, and all for the wrong reasons. Photography has become nothing but noise, for the most part, with nothing said and no stories of value told.

Once-upon-a-time photography was a novelty, and photographers were too. Straight photographs from the 19th century usually reveal the locals (complete with at least one person turning their head just as the exposure fires), having come to pose and posture in the knowledge that they'd be captured on glass plate for posterity. In doing the same these days, you're more likely be approached by some jobsworth 'security' guard insisting that you can't photograph this or that, but that is for another story.

'For the sake of posterity' is an informal and long-term body of work that records the living history of London's contemporary urban environment and life within it, with a knowing eye on the future. It is a personal work to satisfy my desire to record life for the sake of posterity and is shot on analogue 35mm, medium and large formats, as well as digital 35mm equivalent.

A street scene in Aldgate.
untitled. c.2016.
People sitting outside a Japanese restuarant on the corner of D'Arblay Street and Wardour Street in Soho.
untitled. c.2018.
A street scene in the City.
untitled. c.2018.
Looking west down Aldgate High Street.
untitled. c.2016.
A street scene in Soho.
untitled. c.2018.
The demolition of the Fruit Exchange and White's Row car park continues.
untitled. c.2016.